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A Novel Approach To Life!

[January 09 | 0 Comments | 1224 views]
 
 

Dear Fellow Rotarians & friends,

Our club has so many accomplished people in our ranks. I’m sure the sentiments that I’m about to share will resonate with virtually everyone.

There are ups and downs in life that happen to everyone. No one is exempt. Think about the challenges that we have faced in our lives. Think about the sense of triumph that we feel when we overcome those challenges.

It’s been said that everyone’s life contains a novel. It’s true when you think about it. Our lives will show our wins and losses, and that’s okay. But more importantly, let it show that we tried and that we have dared greatly.

At the end of the day, let it be documented that we weren’t on the sidelines of life; we were in the game trying to make a difference; that we worked hard and were brave on our journey. Let it show that we tried our best to make a difference…and where we have failed, let it show that we have learned from our failures and have found both humility and a pathway to success.  In the novel of our life, let it show that we made a difference in the lives of others; we fought the good fight; we failed and succeeded and failed and succeeded and never stopped trying to do our best.

Theodore Roosevelt gave one of his most famous speeches on April 23, 1910, in Paris. I refer to it often. I find it very inspiring, especially during some of the most challenging moments.

“The Person in the Arena”

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man or woman who points out how the strong person stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man or woman who are actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes up short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends themselves in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if they fail, at least fails while daring greatly, so that their place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat."

 

Yours in Rotary,

Tony